Let Your Christmas Gift Be Nature

Let Your Christmas Gift Be Nature

Our partner Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) is holding their annual Christmas drive. Please choose to support the lake by designating a gift to a land purchase on Loughborough. Nature Conservancy is very active in protecting the lands around our lake because they are so special. You might be surprised to learn that the Frontenac Arch that starts on North Shore of our lake is the third most biodiverse (read: best nature) area in Canada! So rather than taking a material gift, give the gift of nature.

The Lake Dinosaur

The Lake Dinosaur

Everyone knows about Nessie, the lake monster of legend purported to inhabit Loch Ness, a lake in Scotland with a topography similar to Loughborough Lake. Over the many decades of sightings, various explanations have been put forth regarding the origin of this mysterious lake monster. The most popular, no doubt, is that Nessie is one of the last remaining Plesiosaurus, a lake dinosaur that was presumed extinct over 66 million years ago.

Water Quality

Water Quality

When you get down to it, one of the major reasons why people come to Loughborough Lake is because of, well, the lake. The water is the basis for why people build cottages and homes here, buy boats and other toys and choose to come back and take their annual vacation or even spend their lives beside it. There are obviously many other reasons why we come to the lake but the water is probably key to why we are here. So it follows that lake water quality is really important to peoples’ enjoyment of the lake.

Shoreline Restoration

Shoreline Restoration

Watersheds Canada is thrilled to come back to Loughborough Lake with an action project! In the Love Your Lake report for Loughborough Lake, several recommendations were made for landowners to voluntarily restore their shorelines to more natural states to benefit the health of Loughborough Lake. Because of generous funding support for Love Your Lake follow-up projects from the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Watersheds Canada is able to provide shoreline property owners on Loughborough Lake with an opportunity to have their shorelines professionally restored with native plants at only 25% of the cost to landowners.

Bats

Bats

Bats are nocturnal flying mammals that feed at night and can be found in both city and rural locations.  During the day, they roost in caves, in holes or leaves of trees, in attics or in abandoned buildings.  Although they look like a little mouse with wings, they are not related to mice at all, as most people think.  Most bats are very tiny with the smallest ones weighting 1.8 grams (weighing less than a dime).  It is their wings that make them appear larger, but their body size is generally quite small.  They range in size, with the largest ones being flying foxes which are located in the tropics.  Their life span is usually 4-8 years, although they can live longer than this. They emit a high pitched shriek or shrill call that is undetectable to human ears.

Black Bear

Black Bear

We do live in bear country, although they are not always visible. We had a reminder of that recently when a young bear decided to investigate one of the garbage boxes, in broad daylight, along North Shore Road in the East Basin of Loughborough Lake. Probably most of the long term residents of Loughborough Lake have heard of bear sighting incidents at one time or another. They may have also seen them. Typically this does not happen often although there is some evidence that sightings may be increasing. The Whig Standard stated: "Ministry officials do not think the bear population is expanding. Instead, they suggest development encroaching on traditional bear habitat is at the root of the increased number of sightings.

Coyotes

Coyotes

We live in Coyote territory. Yes, the coyotes do live in our area and they are here to stay.  It is the Eastern Coyote who is most predominant in our area. The wolf population prior to 1850 was extensively hunted by man and as the wolf population decreased, the coyote population expanded. 

The Eastern Coyote is a hybrid species – a mix of Western Coyote and Eastern Wolf. The Timberwolf or Grey Wolf is mainly located in Northern Canada and is the largest of the species ranging from 80-125 lbs.  The Eastern Wolf located in mainly northern areas like Algonquin Park is a bit smaller ranging from 45-75 lbs.  The Eastern Coyote (the main one in our area) is the smallest of the species ranging from 30-45 lbs.  Since the Eastern Coyote is a mix of Western Coyote and Eastern Wolf, you may see a larger coyote in our area as well.  What we see and hear are mainly coyotes and not wolves. 

Fishers

Fishers

The Fisher is a member of the weasel family and it got its name from the European Poul Cat that the French called Fitch (pronounced Fiche).  This developed into the name Fisher.   The males, slightly larger than the females usually weigh about 15 lbs while the females who tend to be a bit smaller, are in the range of approximately 9 lbs.  They are dark brown ranging to almost black in color. Twenty years ago our area did not have any Fishers, since Algonquin Park was the furthest south that they ventured. Their range of locations had been greatly diminished, especially in Southeastern Ontario, due to logging, overharvesting for fur and predator control.