Endangered Species Act Review Could Gut Wildlife Protections

Endangered Species Act Review Could Gut Wildlife Protections

An urgent message from the David Suzuki Foundation: “The Government of Ontario has set its sights on “improving” Ontario’s Endangered Species Act, posting a discussion paper on the Environmental Registry. However, the paper makes it clear that the province’s primary objective in revisiting the act is not to ensure efficient recovery for Ontario’s at-risk species but, rather, to find even more efficiencies for industries that want to operate where these animals and plants live.”

To help the many endangered species on our lake, please sign the Suzuki Foundation’s petition and the Ontario Nature petition and let your voice be heard.

Deer in Winter

Deer in Winter

It is bitter cold out in the Loughborough Wilderness in mid-winter. Deer are roaming outside their normal confines of the woods to get their hoofs on the last remaining patches of grass and roughage from last season, buried deep under the snow. They pillage the juniper bushes on the islands and lakeshore at night for a few remaining leafs, reducing some to stalks that will regenerate in spring.

Nature Conservancy: Gift to Preserve the 3rd Best Nature in Canada

Nature Conservancy: Gift to Preserve the 3rd Best Nature in Canada

Please choose to support the lake by designating a gift to a land purchase on Loughborough via our partner Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC). Nature Conservancy is very active in protecting the lands around our lake because they are so special. You might be surprised to learn that the Frontenac Arch that starts on North Shore of our lake is the third most biodiverse (read: best nature) area in Canada! So rather than accepting a material birthday gift this year, give the gift of nature.

The Lake Dinosaur

The Lake Dinosaur

Everyone knows about Nessie, the lake monster of legend purported to inhabit Loch Ness, a lake in Scotland with a topography similar to Loughborough Lake. Over the many decades of sightings, various explanations have been put forth regarding the origin of this mysterious lake monster. The most popular, no doubt, is that Nessie is one of the last remaining Plesiosaurus, a lake dinosaur that was presumed extinct over 66 million years ago.

Water Quality

Water Quality

When you get down to it, one of the major reasons why people come to Loughborough Lake is because of, well, the lake. The water is the basis for why people build cottages and homes here, buy boats and other toys and choose to come back and take their annual vacation or even spend their lives beside it. There are obviously many other reasons why we come to the lake but the water is probably key to why we are here. So it follows that lake water quality is really important to peoples’ enjoyment of the lake.

Shoreline Restoration

Shoreline Restoration

Watersheds Canada is thrilled to come back to Loughborough Lake with an action project! In the Love Your Lake report for Loughborough Lake, several recommendations were made for landowners to voluntarily restore their shorelines to more natural states to benefit the health of Loughborough Lake. Because of generous funding support for Love Your Lake follow-up projects from the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Watersheds Canada is able to provide shoreline property owners on Loughborough Lake with an opportunity to have their shorelines professionally restored with native plants at only 25% of the cost to landowners.

Bats

Bats

Bats are nocturnal flying mammals that feed at night and can be found in both city and rural locations.  During the day, they roost in caves, in holes or leaves of trees, in attics or in abandoned buildings.  Although they look like a little mouse with wings, they are not related to mice at all, as most people think.  Most bats are very tiny with the smallest ones weighting 1.8 grams (weighing less than a dime).  It is their wings that make them appear larger, but their body size is generally quite small.  They range in size, with the largest ones being flying foxes which are located in the tropics.  Their life span is usually 4-8 years, although they can live longer than this. They emit a high pitched shriek or shrill call that is undetectable to human ears.